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LIBLICENSE-L  October 2014

LIBLICENSE-L October 2014

Subject:

Re: Query re mandatory deposit of theses and dissertations

From:

LIBLICENSE <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

LibLicense-L Discussion Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 2 Oct 2014 20:18:53 -0400

Content-Type:

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Parts/Attachments

text/plain (66 lines)

From: "Jim O'Donnell" <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 20:27:48 -0400

Rick's institution's position should be recognized as a direct
reversal of the protocol that obtained from the origins of the modern
doctoral dissertation until very recently indeed.  The dissertation
was intrinsically a publication and its defense a public act:  the
public-ness was an important part of the institution and the defense a
formal coming-out party for the new scholar.  When dissertations began
to be Ann Arborized rather than published (I take the phrase from a
deceased friend who claimed to be the first, in about 1960, doctoral
candidate at his American university to Ann Arborize rather than pay
to have the dissertation printed -- he was an Irish priest with no
money to pay for it), then the eventual transformation of the
dissertation into a book from a university press became more common.

If we reverted to publishing in purely electronic form all
dissertations and acknowledging them as publications, what would
become of the first book crisis?

All that said, I don't know when I first heard of active, much less
acknowledged and condoned, resistance to publication, but I want to
say it is no more than 20 years ago:  I'd be glad to hear real data on
that point.

Jim O'Donnell
Georgetown


On Wed, Oct 1, 2014 at 6:45 PM, LIBLICENSE <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> From: Rick Anderson <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 12:55:22 +0000
>
> At my institution we require deposit of theses and dissertations, but we
> allow authors to put an embargo on public access if they wish. To deny
> them that option would seem to me like a pretty fundamental breach of
> academic freedom.
>
> ---
> Rick Anderson
> Assoc. Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections
> Marriott Library, University of Utah
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
> On 9/30/14, 5:30 PM, "LIBLICENSE" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>From: Laura Czerniewicz <[log in to unmask]>
>>Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:08:37 +0000
>>
>>Thanks for a very useful list which I enjoy following. I now need to
>>get a sense from others. Our university Council recently passed an
>>open access mandate which inter alia requires theses and dissertations
>>for be deposited before graduation. Two of the faculties have
>>requested that the metadata be put up but there be a two year embargo
>>to allow time for publishing. What are the pros and cons of doing this
>>in othersĀ¹ experiences? What reasons might one give in argument either
>>way?
>>
>>Thanks in advance
>>
>>Laura
>>
>> ________________________________
>>UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN

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