LIBLICENSE-L@LISTSERV.CRL.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LIBLICENSE-L Home

LIBLICENSE-L Home

LIBLICENSE-L  December 2014

LIBLICENSE-L December 2014

Subject:

Re: Acela on Thanksgiving Sunday

From:

LIBLICENSE <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

LibLicense-L Discussion Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 3 Dec 2014 18:27:42 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (87 lines)

From: Claudia Holland <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2014 17:11:49 +0000

But, Joe, what is it that you miss about bookstores, if you donĀ¹t miss
print books?

Claudia Holland


On 12/1/14, 7:13 PM, "LIBLICENSE" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>From: Joseph Esposito <[log in to unmask]>
>Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2014 11:54:50 -0500
>
>I read this post just prior to boarding a flight from Los Angeles to
>New York.  By my estimate well over half the passengers were watching
>a movie or sports event on the seat-back video display.  So in
>addition to the question of print vs. digital books, we have the
>competition with other media.  My view is that consumer publishing,
>insofar as it is a species of entertainment, will be seriously
>challenged by the many new media alternatives.  In this respect, Apple
>is a bigger threat than Amazon.
>
>As for shelf space at Barnes & Noble, this is much discussed in trade
>book circles.  We had an unsustainable high point for book shelf space
>in the 1990s (the increased shelf space for superstores did not
>materially improve sales in the aggregate, so the cost of the retail
>operations inevitably would make the model collapse, even without the
>introduction of ebooks).  A B&N store at that time with 150,000 titles
>was not 100% books (calendars, toys, cards, etc. were always part of
>the mix), but there is no doubt that calling B&N a bookstore now seems
>almost fraudulent. Interestingly, other stores have now begun to sell
>books (e.g., Anthropologie).  So is the shelf space growing or
>shrinking?
>
>What is clear, though, is that it is shrinking for intellectually
>serious books.  A clothing boutique may carry books, but probably not
>those that the members of this list consider relevant.
>
>In about 1995 I saw the entire Loeb Classical Library in a Borders on
>Michigan Avenue in Chicago.  I knew that was simply marketing, an
>attempt to make the store seem more serious than it was, to add "tone"
>to the off-price books in the front of the store.
>
>The book business is a small one. It will persist, but over time it
>will likely return to its core constituency of serious readers, most
>of whom will find their book online.  I don't miss print books myself,
>but I do miss bookstores.
>
>Joe Esposito
>
>
>On Sun, Nov 30, 2014 at 4:49 PM, LIBLICENSE <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> From: "Jim O'Donnell" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2014 16:11:05 -0500
>>
>> Back to my old haunts, here's today's report on the progress of
>>e-reading:
>>
>> There were about 250 people on the train, quite full for Thanksgiving.
>> I should have said years ago doing this that I always measure between
>> Metropark and Philadelphia.
>>
>> 114 people were engaged with electronic devices -- laptops, tablets,
>> readers, smartphones.  I can't count on three hands at once, so I'm
>> only approximating when I say that 30-50% of the devices in use were
>> smartphones.
>>
>> 37 people were engaged with paper materials of some kind or other, of
>> whom 17 were holding actual paper codex books.  (Other paper:
>> newspaper, magazines, school notebooks).  One of them was the first
>> person I have ever seen after many years of looking to be reading a
>> volume of Greek literature with the Greek text visible -- a Loeb
>> Classical Library volume of Aelian, a minor figure and distinctly an
>> advanced taste.  (A few weeks ago I did see a gentleman of mature
>> years, who proved on investigation to be a person of mature wealth and
>> family lineage, reviewing the basics of ancient Greek in the classic
>> textbook of Chase and Phillips, which he first used in prep school
>> about 60 years ago.  Reading Aelian is a large step beyond that:
>> enjoyable, without a question, inasmuch as his works are compilations
>> of anecdotes and lore of quite dubious value.)
>>
>> I was, um, er, watching an Inspector Montalbano video on my iPad . . .
>>
>> Jim O'Donnell

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options



Archives

January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011

RSS1